Veterans Face Higher Risk of ALS

Existing evidence supports the conclusion that people who have served in the military are at a greater risk of developing ALS and dying from the disease than those with no history of military service. Study after study continues to demonstrate this to be true: If you serve in the military, regardless of the branch of service, regardless of whether you served in the Persian Gulf War, Vietnam, Korea, or World War II, and regardless of whether you served during a time of peace or a time of war, you are at a greater risk of dying from ALS than if you had not served in the military. In fact, a Harvard University research study tracked ex-service members back to 1910 and found that U.S. veterans carry a nearly 60 percent greater risk of contracting ALS than civilians.

Joe Zappa
Joe Zappa, of Collinsville, Illinois, holds a photo of his father.  Joe, also a military veteran, was diagnosed with ALS in 2015.

With your help, our Association has been able to assist military veterans who are fighting ALS.  Some of the efforts your support has made possible:

RESEARCH:
The Association has worked with Congress to establish the ALS Research Program (ALSRP) at the Department of Defense in 2007. The ALSRP is the only ALS research program at the DOD and is focused on translational research, with the specific goal of finding new treatments for the disease. Congress appropriated $7.5 million for the program in 2016, bringing total funding for the program to more than $60 million. This funding has supported 44 ALS research studies which have resulted in 25 peer reviewed publications and, most importantly, the discovery of four potential treatments for ALS.

ADVOCACY:
Thanks to the efforts of The ALS Advocates, key members of Congress, advocates and the Department of Veterans Affairs, ALS has been listed as a disease entitled to presumptive service connection. This means that if a service member is diagnosed with ALS his or her condition will be presumed to have occurred during or been aggravated by military service and as such be entitled to service connection and full benefits. These benefits are described briefly below. An overview of benefits available to veterans, survivors and dependents is available from the VA here.

CASE MANAGEMENT:
In-home consultations by an ALS case manager to help assess, plan and facilitate care, and evaluate and advocate for options and services to meet the individual with ALS’s health needs through available resources.

ALS-SPECIFIC HEALTHCARE:
The VA St. Louis John Cochran Division, in partnership with The ALS Association St. Louis Regional Chapter opened the doors to a multidisciplinary ALS clinic this past May.  It offers local veterans multidisciplinary clinical services under the expertise of a team of staff who are dedicated to the care, understanding and treatment of ALS.  Under the direction of Dr. Brian Sommerville, the clinic is held on a bi-monthly basis on the 1st and 3rd Fridays of each month. The Veterans Administration has the ability to provide comprehensive interdisciplinary ALS care that includes not only essential disciplines but also VA-specific programs such as Home Based Primary Care and integrated hospice and palliative care services.

COLLABORATION:
The ALS Association works directly with the Paralyzed Veterans Association to advocate for Veterans living with ALS. The Paralyzed Veterans of America is a congressionally chartered veterans service organization founded in 1946 that has developed a unique expertise on a wide variety of issues for veterans with spinal cord injuries, including ALS.   Benefits Advocates are available to help ensure that you receive all service connected benefits.

Thank you for your support of our nation’s military heroes as they fight yet another battle – ALS. For more information on the link between ALS and the military, and the programs and services available to veterans with ALS, please visit our website.

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