Thank You for Sharing Your Journey with Me

By Heather Burns, MSW, LMSW, ALS Association Care Services Coordinator

Today, I received two phone calls. I had that familiar gut wrenching feeling when the names of the patient’s loved one’s flashed across the giant iPhone screen. I hesitated when answering, as if maybe that could change what the caller was about to say…

“My loved one has passed away.” I knew it was coming before today. I knew it was coming before they picked up the phone to call me. I knew it the moment I walked in to meet the family for the initial home visit, but with ALS, I never truly know when I may actually get that call. Everyone’s progression, while always devastating, is always different.

During both of these calls, the loved one on the other end thanked me for the support I provided them and their family member. After almost four years, I still find myself a bit tongue tied when someone thanks me for what I did for their family. Yes, it is my “job”, but it is a job that I have chosen. I take pride in my work and in helping others. But honestly, I think I struggle with what to say back because how do I appropriately and genuinely express my gratitude towards THEM? My appreciation for having just had the privilege of MEETING them and their beloved? The gratefulness of being welcomed into their home during one of the most vulnerable times of their lives? Learning some of the struggles they faced as a family before this disease even became a factor within an hour of meeting? How do I tell the patients and families that I meet how thankful I am that they have given me perspective on what it means to live? Or what it means to die? Is it even appropriate for me to do so? Would they be taken aback when I say it?

How do I adequately and appropriately express to the men and women that I am meeting in my work, that they are the ones providing me with a service? That they are giving me a gift? It’s not wrapped neatly in Tiffany Blue. I cannot hold it or exchange it for a different size. It is a rare gift with no price tag that money could never buy. It is perspective, it is life lessons, it is sorrow, and it is beautiful.

So, from this point forward, I am making a commitment to those I serve to do better at expressing my thankfulness. To the family’s I have worked with in the past, present, and future I want you to know this: While you are facing one of the most difficult times of your life, a time when you may feel like you have lost a sense of who you are, lost the connection to who you were, or a time when you may have no idea who you will be…thank you. Thank you for giving me the privilege of meeting you and for walking alongside you during this journey.

Lighting the memorial candle at the Springfield Walk to Defeat ALS
Heather Burns lighting the memorial candle at the Walk to Defeat ALS.

Heather Burns began working with the St. Louis Regional Chapter as a care services coordinator in 2013. She assists families by educating them on ALS and symptom management, helping to reduce their financial burden by presenting community resources, and offering emotional support for both patients and caregivers.  She received her Masters of Social Work in 2017 from the University of Missouri, St. Louis.

One thought on “Thank You for Sharing Your Journey with Me”

  1. Heather, you’re the best! One of the best gifts an ALS caregiver can receive is a conversation with someone who knows exactly what you’re going through. They may not have walked the road personally, but they know many who have – and, oh, what a comfort that is! Knowing you’re not alone is invaluable. Thank you, Heather, for making the road a bit smoother. You were such a friend to me and Don. I’ll forever remember!

    Like

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