Technologies That Make Life Easier for Caregivers

By June Duncan

Assistive technologies for the disabled have come a long way since the advent of automated wheelchairs and hearing aids. Smart technology has opened a new world of possibilities for people with disabilities and those who care for them. Smartphones, tablets, and an ever-growing list of apps are helping the disabled improve mobility, communication capabilities, speech, and vision. One of the greatest benefits is the ability to foster better communication between the disabled and their caregivers. Today, technology enables disabled persons to care for themselves more effectively, which makes things easier on caregivers, who often suffer from fatigue and burnout. Technology also helps give disabled persons more independence and a greater sense of confidence and control over their own environment.


Tablets have become a valuable tool, helping people with speech disabilities communicate through apps that provide access to an extensive list of words. Augie AAC and Speak for Yourself give people access to more than 13,000 words with the tap of a finger. Both apps transform your tablet into a device for people who have autism, cerebral palsy, and other conditions that constitute a complex communications need. It even aids the development of verbal speech.

Smartphone Navigation

Smartphones today are dynamic tools for communicating and accessing information. Speech recognition technology allows people with visual impairments or learning disabilities to use smartphones. It’s an especially useful tool for people with dyslexia. It reads texts and emails out loud and even allows users to use social media sites like Instagram. Apple has been a pioneer for decades in different forms of smart technology aimed at helping disabled people live more independent lives. Its assistive touch technology helps people with motor-control problems use an iPhone or iPad without having to use their fingers in complex ways to size the screen and adjust touch-based controls (like volume control) more easily. Voice-activated systems can also help visually impaired people control their home entertainment systems.

Notification Light System

One especially useful notification system can be customized to communicate different messages to hearing-impaired individuals through a system of multicolored lights that can alert them, for example, when someone comes to the door, when it’s time to leave for school or work, or when dinner is ready. The system can be integrated with smart home-control technologies like Amazon’s Echo. There is also a two-way communication technology that can translate sign language into text for people who are not hearing impaired, a useful tool for helping caregivers and care subjects communicate.

Cognitive Challenges

Individuals with cognitive challenges and memory impairment sometimes have trouble taking care of themselves, forgetting to take medications or prepare meals. A program called Lively uses sensors to track the daily movements and behavior patterns of cognitively disabled individuals. Caregivers can log into a web page to track their care subject’s movements and activities, making sure he or she is sleeping and eating properly and performing other normal daily activities. Still more sophisticated Internet-based smart technologies allow wheelchair-bound individuals to interact with their surroundings in ways that wouldn’t be possible otherwise. Lights, blinds, thermostats, appliances, sprinklers, and even pet feeders can be controlled with a smartphone, as can door locks and home security systems.

Technology is helping improve the lives of people with many different disabilities. It’s also beneficial to caregivers who live on-site or provide care remotely, protecting loved ones who are highly vulnerable to accidents or mishaps caused by their disabilities. Communication is the key, and there are many apps and systems that can make it easier for individuals with visual and hearing impairments to communicate with their caregivers.

June Duncan is the primary caregiver to her 85-year-old mom and the co-creator of Rise Up for Caregivers, which offers support for family members and friends who have taken on the responsibility of caring for their loved ones.  She is passionate about helping and supporting other caregivers and is currently writing a book titled, The Complete Guide to Caregiving: A Daily Companion for New Senior Caregivers, due out in Winter 2018.

For more information and resources for caregivers, please visit


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