Communities Join Together to Support People with ALS and Fight for a Cure

A community partner event is a fundraising activity that is organized and managed by a family, group or individual who is acting independent of The ALS Association St. Louis Regional Chapter. This August, five community partner events took place across eastern Missouri and central and southern Illinois, ranging from a tractor pull, an awareness walk before a baseball game, and two different golf tournaments. There was even an ALS Ice Bucket Challenge event earlier this month, four years after the original Ice Bucket Challenge swept social media and national headlines. This August, and every August until we find a cure, reminds us that great things happen when we come together. With all of the extra events throughout the region it was even more exceptional.

Each event has a huge impact on the community and helps people with ALS and their families in several ways. Here are five reasons community partner events are a great way to get involved in the fight against ALS.

  1. It gives people the opportunity to help in a way that works for them.

People who hold a community partner event have the chance to get creative and form an outing unique to their community. It could be anything from an activity they enjoy doing or a tie-in with a local company that wants to help. Honoring or remembering their loved one with ALS through an event with them in mind means a lot to everyone involved.

Miners 2017
Strike Out ALS Awareness Walk in Marion, IL
  1. It brings awareness to people that might not know about ALS.

ALS is by definition a rare disease. Unless someone is directly affected or knows someone with the disease personally, it’s possible they have never heard of ALS. Bringing awareness to ALS through a community partner event allows others to learn more about the disease affecting someone near them.

  1. It can be a fun opportunity to get your community together.

There are endless examples of how these events can turn into a fun day for a good cause.  For smaller communities that only get together a couple of times a year, this gives them one more excuse. Some even become an annual event that people look forward to throughout the year.

Read about the Benton VFW/American Legion’s Ice Bucket Challenge

  1. It lets people do something more for the person they know with ALS.

Making a donation or participating in Chapter events gives people the ability to contribute to a cause they care deeply about. For those who want to go the extra mile, holding their own event gives them the opportunity to do so. And, because some continue to hold community partner events after their loved one has passed away from ALS, they have a chance every year to honor their memory and continue to give back.

Schoemehl Run 2017
Jim Schoemehl Run in Webster Groves, MO
  1. Donations raised help people with ALS and their families.

Community partner events contribute to supporting the unmet needs of people with ALS in eastern Missouri and central and southern Illinois. Unmet needs, like nutrition, caregiver relief, counseling and assistive technology, put a burden on families already going through so much that donations can help relieve. The Chapter also supports people with ALS through programs, advocacy and research. The Chapter is dedicated to helping people with ALS live as comfortably as possible.

If you’re interested in holding your own community partner event, the Chapter can provide guidance along the way. You are not alone in your journey with ALS, especially if part of your journey is involving your community.

For more information on ALS, The ALS Association St. Louis Regional Chapter, and community partner events, visit www.alsa-stl.org.

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