Living with ALS: Keep Your World Large

By Julia Henderson-Kalb, OTD OTR/L and Elissa Held Bradford, PT, PhD, NCS

What do you want to be able to do in a day? What activities are important to you? Everyone craves activity. It is part of our human experience (1). However, oftentimes when people are diagnosed with a disease like ALS, their world tends to shrink. They might isolate themselves, stay at home the majority of the time, and stop doing the things they love to do in exchange for activities that aren’t very meaningful to them, like watching TV for hours on end. As part of the therapy team at Saint Louis University’s ALS Certified Center of Excellence, one of our priorities is to help people diagnosed with ALS understand how to keep their world LARGE so that they can enjoy meaningful activity for as long as possible.

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Technologies That Make Life Easier for Caregivers

By June Duncan

Assistive technologies for the disabled have come a long way since the advent of automated wheelchairs and hearing aids. Smart technology has opened a new world of possibilities for people with disabilities and those who care for them. Smartphones, tablets, and an ever-growing list of apps are helping the disabled improve mobility, communication capabilities, speech, and vision. One of the greatest benefits is the ability to foster better communication between the disabled and their caregivers. Today, technology enables disabled persons to care for themselves more effectively, which makes things easier on caregivers, who often suffer from fatigue and burnout. Technology also helps give disabled persons more independence and a greater sense of confidence and control over their own environment.

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Caregiver Confidential: It Takes a Village

While reading online the other day, I came across a popular saying that I hadn’t seen in a while: “It takes a village.” Although familiar with its general meaning, which refers to the communal raising of children, in a broader context, can’t the concept of a “village” also apply to caregiving for a loved one with a terminal illness? Doesn’t it take many individuals—caregivers, medical and social services professionals, friends, and family members, all working together—to provide the best possible care for an ALS patient?

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More Resources for People with ALS

The toll that ALS takes on a family is devastating – and can strain a family emotionally, physically and financially.   The ALS Association helps ease the physical, emotional and financial burdens that often accompany an ALS diagnosis by providing free programs and services to help people with ALS and their loved ones manage this journey. We also have an extensive referral network and can help identify additional support within the community.

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Understanding Insurance and Benefits When You Have ALS

Navigating the maze of health insurance is challenging for anyone and can be particularly overwhelming for people with ALS.  We’ve compiled some tips and information that may help save you time and energy spent figuring out the complicated web of insurance benefits.

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Caregiver Confidential: “Who Lives, Who Dies, Who Tells Your Story?”

But when you’re gone, who remembers your name?

Who keeps your flame?

Hamilton, “Who Lives, Who Dies, Who Tells Your Story?”

I was fortunate to see Hamilton in Chicago in December. (I highly recommend going when it comes to St. Louis this spring.) One of the most moving musical numbers and a personal favorite of mine was the finale, “Who Lives, Who Dies, Who Tells Your Story?” In fact, I become teary-eyed every time I listen to the lyrics, because they are so on-point. I thought I finished telling my family’s journey with ALS, but after watching Hamilton, I realized that I had one final point to make.

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What Is FTD and How Is It Connected to ALS?

FTD (frontotemporal degeneration or frontotemporal dementia) refers to a group of disorders that causes progressive damage to the temporal and frontal lobes of the brain associated with personality, behavior and language.  Loss of function in this area of the brain can lead to impulsive behavior and speech difficulties.  Usually FTD does not affect the parts of the nervous system that control muscle movement, but about 10-15% of people with FTD also experience motor neuron degeneration called FTD with motor neuron disease (FTD/MND) or FTD with ALS.  Over the past 15 years, doctors and scientists’ knowledge of the connection of these diseases has rapidly grown through genetic discovery, brain imaging studies and biomarker studies.  Specifically, researchers were able to confirm the connection between FTD and ALS when the TAR DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43) was identified as the central protein in both ALS and the most common type of FTD.  Additionally, up to 40% of FTD cases have been found to carry a C9orf72 gene mutation, which is most common in genetic causes of ALS.

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Thank You for Sharing Your Journey with Me

By Heather Burns, MSW, LMSW, ALS Association Care Services Coordinator

Today, I received two phone calls. I had that familiar gut wrenching feeling when the names of the patient’s loved one’s flashed across the giant iPhone screen. I hesitated when answering, as if maybe that could change what the caller was about to say…

“My loved one has passed away.” I knew it was coming before today. I knew it was coming before they picked up the phone to call me. I knew it the moment I walked in to meet the family for the initial home visit, but with ALS, I never truly know when I may actually get that call. Everyone’s progression, while always devastating, is always different.

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5 Myths about ALS

In these times we live in — the information age — we have access to more facts and data than ever before, but not everything we read or watch is correct.  The Ice Bucket Challenge brought unprecedented awareness to the general public about ALS, but with more exposure also came more misinformation.  Below we break down 5 of the most common misunderstood “facts” about ALS.

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