Handling Hospital Visits When You Have ALS

Even though ALS is a disease that has its own health implications, people with ALS are not immune from other injuries or medical issues. Individuals with ALS can still get sick or hurt themselves in ways unrelated to the disease. Or, people with ALS might have complications directly related to the disease that warrants a visit to the hospital. When an individual with ALS goes to the hospital or the emergency room, they face additional obstacles with hospital staff who may not fully understand how ALS affects a person’s breathing, speech and movement. Extra measures should be taken to ensure people with ALS are cared for in the right way. Here are some tips on what to look out for and how to prevent misunderstanding in the hospital or emergency room.

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Perspectives: Sustineo Alas

Today’s blog post is the first in a recurring monthly series from our good friend Gregg Ratliff. In 2009, Gregg’s wife Nancy was diagnosed with ALS, and he became her full-time caregiver for the next seven years, all while still actively fundraising and advocating for people with ALS and their families.  In his series, “Perspectives: It’s All in How You Look at it,” Gregg will share his insights on ALS and the impact it has on families.

By Gregg Ratliff

Those of us that have met the curse of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis face-to-face whether it is first-hand as a patient, second-hand as a caregiver or so-called third-hand as a friend or family member we know the cruel reality of this scourge! This disease slowly strips away most of the vestiges of life – movement, speech, swallowing, breathing, self-care and freedom. Yet, the mind and feelings remain totally intact. How fair is that? As my children know one of my sayings to them when they were growing up was “Life is not fair.”

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Every August Until a Cure

LeBron James did it. Bill Gates did it. Oprah, Steven Spielberg and President George W. Bush did it. But the majority of people who took the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge in 2014 were not celebrities, just ordinary folks who got caught up in the fun of nominating friends and family on social media to be doused in water and ice for a good cause.  It’s safe to say, however, that there was definitely another reason why the Ice Bucket Challenge gained traction. ALS is a relentless disease that takes away a person’s ability to move, walk, talk, and breathe on their own and keeps them trapped in their body. To watch someone you know go through this is absolutely devastating, and knowing that there is no cure can sometimes make people feel both helpless and hopeless. For the thousands of individuals affected by ALS, this painful reality was fuel for action that inspired a community of people to come together four years ago to create the original ALS Ice Bucket Challenge.

What followed from this largest viral social media movement of all time was not just news feeds packed with ice bucket challenge videos, but real and meaningful impact for people with ALS – and for researchers searching for treatments and a cure.  The effects of the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge continue to be felt in the ALS community.

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The Kimmswick 5k: A Family Honors Their Mother’s Memory

By Jason Ratliff

The Kimmswick 5K is held in memory of Nancy Ratliff, who touched many people’s lives as a daycare teacher and director, Montessori school teacher, dedicated wife and profoundly loving mother, grandmother and friend.

Our family was turned upside down in the summer of 2009 when, at the age of 61, Nancy was diagnosed with ALS.

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A Deeper Level of Understanding

By Heather Burns, MSW, LMSW, ALS Association Care Services Team Manager

I thought I had a good grasp of the psychological impact of ALS, until I temporarily lost the use of my right hand. I am a south paw, but the inability to use both hands in the way I am accustomed to using them in my almost 31 years of life has been proven to be quite the learning experience.

After returning home from the emergency room, to be greeted by a sink full of dishes, is when the reality of my temporary disability set in. I always strive to have the dishes done before I go to bed. It’s a personal goal. I stood there, hunched over the sink in tears, that I wasn’t able to accomplish this task. My significant other came in and assured me he’d take care of them. But that didn’t make me feel better as I slouched off to bed.
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5 Things to Know Before Enrolling in the National ALS Registry

The National ALS Registry is used to collect, manage and analyze data about people with ALS. The more people signed into the Registry, the more information researchers have access to in their work toward a cure, treatment, and prevention. When people with ALS include themselves in the National ALS Registry, they’re including themselves in the national effort to end ALS.

Because the Registry is its own unique research project and requires people with ALS to join the Registry directly, here are five things people with ALS should know before enrolling.

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Fighting in Memory of Grandma Ann

By Molly Cruitt

Earlier this summer, I got married at the church I grew up in, three days after my grandmother’s 78th birthday. My grandmother wasn’t there.

It’s been almost a full decade since my grandma lost her battle with ALS plus dementia, and it’s easy to get lost thinking of all the things she’s missed and the moments that will continue to happen without her present.

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